Heading down the uncertain Covid-19 road

Here we are again, staring down the Covid-19 virus while trying to keep businesses and the economy going.

We had hoped the “all of Government” team that responded to the lockdown and alert level changes last time would have learned from that. We believed there was a plan for the inevitable emergence of Covid-19 in the community.

Having dealt with this week’s change in alert levels around New Zealand, and in particular, the move to Alert Level 3 in Auckland, it doesn’t feel that way.

That’s not to say the Government isn’t working hard. It is just that they are once again retro-fitting the policy and planning to the announcement.

We have seen that on the enforced Auckland border checkpoints – designed to stop the spread of Covid-19 by keeping Aucklanders within their city boundaries, and stopping anyone who doesn’t need to enter those boundaries from getting in.

Good in theory, but despite the Health Minister signing an order that allowed for the free movement of freight, that was not the reality. Trucks got stuck for many hours at the border check points and there has been a lot of lobbying this week to try and ensure a lane for trucks to reduce those wait times. In fact, we believe trucks should have a dedicated lane and shouldn’t have to stop at all as they pass through or leave Auckland.

Long delays in traffic present a number of issues for the supply chain. These include potential damage to perishable goods, health and safety considerations for drivers who are restricted by the hours they can work, and missing deadlines to ports and airports for exports and imports. Some trucks also carry livestock and the health and safety of that stock must be considered.

It’s a balancing act to try and get what we want in the midst of all the other demands. The Police have been very helpful. But they have also pointed out that there are social media forums where truck drivers are offering to guide people in and out of Auckland by avoiding the checkpoints, or pick up passengers on back routes and take them across the border.

This behaviour is very damaging to the trucking industry and to the work we are trying to do to get better access for trucks through checkpoints.

If people don’t play by the rules, then the Police will have to consider stopping trucks.

I would urge all employers to speak to their drivers and to check social media and stop this commentary where they can. It helps no one. This is a deadly virus and we must do everything we can to keep it at controllable levels.

We want everyone to stay safe at this uncertain time and we are aware that time delays put enormous stress on drivers. If costs are incurred by businesses due to Government restrictions, these costs must be passed through the chain. What’s more, drivers cannot be put at risk working long hours because of the Government’s restrictions and rules.

Today we will find out what will happen with the status of Level 3 in Auckland and Level 2 throughout the rest of the country. Given the rapid increase in community transfer case numbers, it seems prudent to prepare for the worst.

If parts, or all of the country, are elevated to the next alert level we will be lobbying for all freight to move freely. This is essential to keep New Zealand functioning at some level.

We also need the road transport industry to do its bit. Follow the rules and if it costs more, pass that cost on. The Government needs to understand the economic consequences of their actions, or give us all access to the money tree.

– Nick Leggett, CEO, Road Transport Forum


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