Professional road users committed to safety

During Road Safety Week 2019, I would like to acknowledge the great work many in the road transport industry are doing to ensure the safety of both their staff and all other road users.

Individual transport companies have staff and vehicles that travel millions of kilometres each year. Safety has to be a top priority when your machinery and people are travelling such vast distances. I got a first-hand run down of what companies are doing when I met with Greg Pert and Jackie Carroll from Tranzliquid (pictured) in Tauranga this week. Theirs is just one example of how companies integrate safety into their operations and their choice of investment in equipment, to ensure their staff get home safely after every trip.

Tranzliquid has combined new technologies and driver training in a commitment to safety. Staff are trained on “observation, anticipation and planning” so that they can manage risks and drive to the conditions.

We know that speed, fatigue and inattention are the big causes of accidents. To combat fatigue, Tranzliquid has designed a system that steps drivers through processes, while driving, to avoid fatigue. This includes a connection with the dispatcher at home base.

Safety features on vehicles now include:

  • Collision avoidance
  • Lane departure
  • Blind spot proximity
  • Disc brakes
  • EBS/ABS
  • Drag torque – anti wheel lock (in snow for instance)
  • Under run – side
  • Under run – front

They know of an incident where the under run on a truck proved life-saving for a car driver who fell asleep and hit a Tranzliquid truck.

Their business aim is to protect their drivers, other road users, their cargo and equipment and they are focused on happy staff and a downwards trend of accidents or incidents.

But they also say, there is only so much businesses can do and road conditions and congestion are impacting on productivity because they cannot move freight around fast enough.

If you can’t maximise the benefits of your clever trucks, there are consequences down the line, including an impact on the wider economy. For example, you might have 30 loads to get to Auckland but you can only manage to get 26 there, due to traffic and road works. The customer and carrier both incur additional costs in delays, and the loss of productivity and efficiency for the transport company reduces their ability and incentive to invest in new equipment and vehicles.

The road transport industry can only do so much to ensure safety. I am constantly being told that drivers are noticing the deteriorating condition of the roads, which will affect the safety of all people using them. Let’s not forget the behavior, skills and attention of all drivers on our roads.

As an economy that relies on goods being transported – to ports and airports for export and around the country for everything that keeps the country ticking – it is essential that the Government invests in more than just median barriers and rumble strips. Shifting the dial and reducing accidents rates and death on the roads involves focusing on many different aspects as outlined above. It will take a long time. It’s a responsibility that falls on all of our shoulders as road users.

– Nick Leggett, CEO, Road Transport Forum

Let’s take a serious look at road safety

April 2019 was the deadliest month on New Zealand roads in 10 years – 45 people dead, and many more lives impacted. It’s tragic and it brings into focus the need for something to be done about New Zealand roads and the way we drive.

It’s equally important that when tragedies occur, we don’t have a knee-jerk reaction. It’s essential to look at the “why?”. Once we understand that, we are best placed to take a strategic, long-term view to provide lasting solutions.

The Government has indicated road safety is a priority and the Road Transport Forum is encouraged by this. We certainly want to be at the table when solutions are designed, as we represent the commercial road users who keep the New Zealand economy moving by getting all the essentials delivered to your door, or your store.

In December last year, Transport Minister Phil Twyford and Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter announced a $1.4 billion, three-year programme to make New Zealand’s highest risk roads safer.

They said, the Safe Network Programme will make 870 kilometres of high volume, high-risk State Highways safer by 2021 with improvements like median and side barriers, rumble strips, and shoulder widening.

Once complete, the improvements are expected to prevent 160 deaths and serious injuries every year.

Absolutely, this is important. But we need to be careful not to think a bit of window dressing will provide long term solutions. The links between road use, driver behaviour, and road safety need to be fully explored.

A strategic look will determine things such as:

  • Statistics – what’s causing these accidents? If it is a drunk driver, no amount of road improvements will matter. If it is road design and increased use, then let’s find the best solution.
  • Is more traffic on the road causing more wear and tear that is not being addressed in time? Where’s the strategy to ensure roads remain fit for purpose, that is, to keep the New Zealand economy moving for commercial road transport users, as well as provide access for tourists and private road users.

Recently, I had the good fortune to spend a couple of hours with John Hickman, of J.D. Hickman in Taranaki. John is a legend in the road transport sector, building up from his original one truck to over 100 trucks today. John is very concerned about the state of New Zealand roads. In a quiet tour of the surrounding highways and local roads, John was able to point out to me their appalling conditions – see the photo above. He’s concerned for his drivers having to drive on sub-standard, poorly constructed roads for hours each day, and for his vehicles and the wear and tear and additional costs that are occurring. Newly built highways, such as the poor quality Kapiti Expressway, demonstrate there is something amiss in our road building. What’s of even greater concern, is a reduction in the highways budget of 15% since the Government took office. Part of the safety equation is well designed, modern highways.

The RTF urges Wellington decision makers to consider long-term strategies for a safe, efficient and sustainable transport network that meets economic realities and business growth plans. There are already many parts of New Zealand where the strain is evident and the economy is impacted by traffic delays.

We are concerned that the ongoing disruption at the New Zealand Transport Agency – currently without a permanent chief executive or a Board Chair – threatens to put the vital issue of roading infrastructure, and with that road safety, out of sights and minds.

– Nick Leggett, CEO, Road Transport Forum